COURSES

Below are a list of courses past and present

Infectious disease omics 2023

Infectious diseases, such as HIV-AIDS, malaria, pneumonia and tuberculosis, account for 25% of global mortality and more than half of all deaths in children under the age of five years. The genetic epidemiology of these diseases can be complex, especially as they may involve several genomes, including the host, pathogen(s) and a vector. There is also a need to look beyond the genome to consider other ‘omes, such as the transcriptome, in a more systems biology framework.

Infectious disease omics 2021

To take full advantage of new ‘omic technologies requires the ability to analyse large amounts of data using methods from bioinformatics, population genetics and statistics – the focus of this course. Specifically, this course offers hands-on experience of processing sequencing data to construct genomes, identifying genomic variants and applying downstream methods, such as phylogenetics. Further, the course covers transcriptomic and proteomic analysis in human and pathogen settings. High profile examples, including malaria, TB and MRSA, will be used to illustrate the concepts, and there is a strong emphasis on how to implement the methods in practice, with the majority of sessions computer-based.

Infectious disease omics 2022

Infectious diseases, such as HIV-AIDS, malaria, pneumonia and tuberculosis, account for 25% of global mortality and more than half of all deaths in children under the age of five years. The genetic epidemiology of these diseases can be complex, especially as they may involve several genomes, including the host, pathogen(s) and a vector. There is also a need to look beyond the genome to consider other ‘omes, such as the transcriptome, in a more systems biology framework.

Infectious disease omics 2018

Infectious diseases, such as HIV-AIDS, malaria, pneumonia and tuberculosis, account for 25% of global mortality and more than half of all deaths in children under the age of five years. The genetic epidemiology of these diseases can be complex, especially as they may involve several genomes, including the host, pathogen(s) and a vector. There is also a need to look beyond the genome to consider other ‘omes, such as the transcriptome, in a more systems biology framework.